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An instruction manual in two volumes based on the use of peroxide in mushroom cultivation, by R. Wayne, Ph. Now translated into Spanish – Romanian And announcing: An entirely new approach to mushroom growing. Non-Sterile Mushroom Cultivation Mushroom growing – a great pastime, but Mushroom growing has the potential to be a fun and fascinating pastime.

Our forests have provided many species of fungi that are both beautiful and delicious, and learning to cultivate them can revive our connection to nature and the earth.

But if we have to buy a lot of equipment to sterilize substrate and clean the air of contaminants, growing mushrooms can lose its romance. And it can get absurdly complicated when cultures keep spoiling, despite our most elaborate precautions.

So why use hydrogen peroxide in mushroom growing? Hydrogen peroxide simplifies the whole process of growing fungi. There\’s no need to build a sterile laboratory, buy a special giant pressure cooker, or even construct a glove box. A low concentration of peroxide keeps out the contaminants, while allowing healthy growth of mushroom tissue. And as the mushroom tissue grows, it converts the peroxide to water and oxygen, leaving a clean, vigorous mushroom culture.

Growing Mushrooms the Easy Way I performed my first experiments to test the peroxide idea in , and it worked. Although the invention was patentable, I decided instead to offer the information to the public in the form of an instruction manual. It is the product of nearly seven years\’ experimentation to perfect the procedures and find new applications for the peroxide method.

The manual in all editions is now in the hands of mushroom growers in 80 countries around the world. In stepwise directions, the peroxide manual explains how to:.

Grow mushroom cultures in an ordinary room. Handle cultures in the open air in a kitchen or non-sterile workshop. Protect cultures from bacteria, yeast, mold, and mushroom spores.

Prepare mushroom cultures without an autoclave. Prepare bulk fruiting substrate at room temperature, without heating and cooling. Do away with costly filter-patch culture bags; use ordinary trashbags instead. Prepare sawdust-based mushroom spawn medium with just a ten minute steaming. Grow mushroom spawn and agar cultures on a bookshelf or in a closet. Contents Slideshow What\’s in Volume I of the peroxide manual?

What\’s in Volume II of the peroxide manual? What\’s this about Non-Sterile Mushroom Cultivation? How do I order the manuals? List of countries where growers have obtained the Peroxide Manual FAQs on mushroom cultivation Basics of mushroom cultivation Mushroom links, books, and vendors of cultures Updates for users of the peroxide manual Sources of supplies for the peroxide method About the Author Found a link that\’s not working?

Please e-mail me. Here I\’m pouring melted nutrient agar containing peroxide into a set of reusable plastic petri dishes. This is taken in my kitchen, with no air filtration in use. After the agar solidifies and the plates are dried for a few days, they are used for maintaining mushroom tissue cultures. Virtually any commonly cultivated mushroom species can be grown on peroxide-treated nutrient agar. Here I am using a metal X-acto knife, already sterilized in the flame of the alcohol lamp nearby, for cutting a chunk of agar culture from a peroxide plate to transfer the mushroom tissue mycelium to a jar of \”minute spawn\” medium, all in the open air of my kitchen.

You can see the halo of white mushroom tissue on the plate, although the photograph exaggerates the size of it relative to the size of the plate. The organism is Hericium erinaceus Lions Mane , a wood decomposer, but other mushroom species can be handled exactly the same way. Here I\’m inoculating a jar \”Ten-minute spawn\” medium in the open air with a chunk of mycelium from an agar culture of Hericium erinaceus, using a flame-sterilized X-acto knife for the transfer.

A stack of peroxide-treated agar Petri dish cultures sits to the left, inside a plastic food storage bag. Spawn is essentially a mushroom \”starter\” culture used to inoculate the final mushroom-producing cultures. The Ten-minute spawn is so-named because it takes only 10 minutes to steam it, compared to at least 45 minutes to sterilize ordinary spawn in a pressure cooker. The medium contains materials chosen to be compatible with peroxide, in this case wood pellet fuel and paper fiber pellets, suitable for cultivation of wood decomposing mushrooms.

Here\’s the bookshelf where I grow my peroxide-treated \”Ten Minute Spawn,\” which will be used to inoculate the final bulk substrate for mushroom production. As always, there is no air filtration in use. The Ten Minute Spawn is a sawdust based medium. Some species are better grown on sterilized grain spawn, which can also be treated with peroxide after pressure-cooking to destroy the peroxide-decomposing.

There are even forms of grain that can be prepared with a brief steaming much like the Ten Minute Spawn, but these tend to be much more expensive than raw grain.

If you are just a beginner at mushroom growing, whether or not you use the peroxide method, you will probably want a pressure cooker for making agar plates although they can be made, less reliably, without it , jars with lids, a couple of pots for boiling water, an alcohol lamp, a small scale or balance for weighing, some petri dishes, some small boxes, some fresh trash bags, a hand mister, and a cool space. Later you may want a fan and an automatic misting system.

To measure the peroxide concentration in the bottles you get from the store, you will also need a small test tube with a lip, and a balloon. You will NOT need a glove box, HEPA filters, ultraviolet lights, a sterile laboratory, laminar flow hoods, air locks, foot washes, etc. For some suggestions on obtaining the supplies used in the peroxide manual if you live in the US or the UK, visit my Sources page.

This shows my simple test for peroxide concentrationnecessary because stock solutions can lose their punch. The test tube received a few milliliters of hydrogen peroxide solution, which has now decomposed to release oxygen, filling the balloon. Although you can\’t see it in this picture, my fingers are holding in place a fat rubber band wrapped around the mouth of the balloon to keep a tight seal on the tube.

Once all the peroxide has broken down, the balloon is carefully removed and the oxygen is measured by releasing it into an inverted graduated cylinder filled with water. Here I am, headless, inoculating a 5 gallon bucket of peroxide-treated oak pellet fuel substrate with a jar of elm oyster \”Ten minute spawn. Pellet fuel is an ideal substrate for the peroxide method, because it is completely peroxide-compatible, free of enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide.

But pellet fuel is far from being the only substrate that works. You can use straw and similar drainable materials details in Volume II of the manual , or certain peroxide-compatible porous woody materials such as sawdust-based cat litter in the UK, Fussy Puss litter , additive-free composite logs in the UK, Clean Heat logs , the sawdust derived from milling of kiln-dried lumber, paper fiber pellets in the US, Crown Animal Bedding or Good Mews Cat litter , paper pulp, and clean cardboard.

Any other porous substrate commonly used for mushroom growth, such as raw sawdust, will work with peroxide if you first pressure-sterilize the substrate, or bake it for several hours at degrees F degrees C , or steam it 24 hours, to destroy the peroxidedecomposing enzymes present in it. Some mushrooms, such as white buttons and their relatives, grow best on compost, which can generally be prepared without peroxide, although I am investigating ways to improve compost making with the help of peroxide.

Here I\’m pouring inoculated, peroxide-treated pellet fuel substrate from a 5 gallon bucket into a fresh plastic \”tall kitchen bag\” supported by a cardboard box. In some cases, it may be more convenient to add spawn to the bags after filling, rather than before. And there are various alternatives to using bags, such as plastic buckets with loose fitting lids. Of course, some mushrooms may be grown in beds rather than in bags. This is taken in my kitchen. No HEPA filters or glove box in sight.

Jars of \”Ten Minute Spawn\” in the background. This is what my wood-decomposing mushroom cultures look like after the trash bag is filled with inoculated, peroxide-treated substrate and sealed with a twist tie. I leave the bag in the cardboard box until the mycelium knits the substrate together. There is no filter on the bag for gas exchange, as the thin plastic allows enough oxygen to diffuse through to the culture.

When the culture is ready to form mushrooms, I put a small slit in the side of the bag, and the mushrooms grow out the slit. Photo courtesy of Joe Durham. What are the additional advantages of the peroxide method? What are the limitations of peroxide use in mushroom growing? What are the different ways a mushroom grower can use peroxide? Can I use peroxide for growing mushrooms on straw or compost?

What substrates can I use for mushroom growing with peroxide? What mushrooms can I grow in the presence of peroxide? How effective is peroxide treatment in mushroom cultivation? How safe is peroxide use in mushroom culture? Can peroxide be used for certified \”organic\” growing of mushrooms?

What equipment do I need to grow mushrooms using the peroxide method? Can the peroxide method be used to grow mushrooms commercially? What are the comparative costs of growing mushrooms with peroxide? How do I order the peroxide manual? With peroxide, you can make sawdust spawn medium from wood pellet fuel with just a ten minute steaming, rather than pressure sterilization. This is one of the fastest methods of making mushroom spawn yet devised.

The spawn can then be grown on a bookshelf in your home, rather than in a sterile laboratory. And, the amount of spawn you can make isn\’t limited by the size of your pressure cooker, since you can use any of a variety of large pots with fitted lids instead. With peroxide, you can prepare sawdust cultures without pressure sterilizing either the bulk substrate or the supplements. You can even do it without heating the substrate. To do this, you will need to use peroxide-compatible starting materials such as wood pellet fuel and selected nitrogen supplements.

Volume I of the peroxide manual describes a simple pellet fuel procedure with a boiling-water pasteurization, and it gives the details on how to select appropriate materials and supplements. Volume II of the manual presents an \”add-and-stir\” protocol for preparing peroxide-compatible porous substrates such as pellet fuel, paper fiber pellets, and kiln-dried sawdust, using peroxide at room temperature. Peroxide can do away with costly filter-patch culture bags for bulk substrate.

 
 

 

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Я плачу вам за то, чтобы вы следили за отчетностью и обслуживали сотрудников, а не шпионили за моим заместителем. Если бы не он, мы бы до сих пор взламывали шифры с помощью карандаша и бумаги. А теперь уходите! – Он повернулся к Бринкерхоффу, с побледневшим лицом стоявшему возле двери.

 – Вы оба.

 
 

Growing mushrooms the easy way pdf download

 
 

Starting a mushroom farm isn\’t simple and not everybody can do it. Knowing what a burgeon is can assist you to understand how to develop them. A burgeon is made of threadlike cells that are known as mycelium. This cell grows by eating dead plants. You must spend extreme interest to details as mushrooms require a really sensitive expanding area.

Various burgeons prefer various growing environments. You will find two kinds of growing mediums that are perfect for growing mushrooms. Compost is ideal for expanding button mushrooms while shiitake mushrooms prefer wood or straw mediums. Whenever you determine on a medium that you will use, which will determine what sort of burgeon will develop best for you.

If you want to turn out to be a industrial mushroom farmer you will need to setup a climate-controlled space in order to grow the mushrooms.

Most growers use tiered compost beds to develop button mushrooms. Shittake mushrooms were being grown in sawdust or wood chips; recently the trend for mushroom farms would be to grow these mushrooms on reduce logs because it\’s felt that they taste better when grown this way. Finding a steady supply of base materials for your medium is extremely important. Locating an animal farm that will sell the processing waste may be an inexpensive method to supply your medium.

Whenever you are first starting out you\’ll wish to weigh the price of various expanding mediums. This book is full of simple do-it-yourself plans to allow you to build an affordable chicken coop on time, on budget with little waste. Bill has put his years of experience in the poultry industry into this easy-to-follow guide and it\’s written with wood working beginners in mind, so you don\’t need to be a master carpenter to build a great looking coop.

No matter what your budget, no matter how large or small your available space, you can build a chicken coop to fit your needs! There are no special skills or fancy tools required, and you\’ll never have to pay for eggs again! This instantly downloadable eBook will not only teach you how to build a coop, but also how to properly care for your chickens so they have productive and enjoyable lives. In the event you usually liked mushrooms, mushroom growing is a superb way to assure your family of a normal supply of this excellent food.

Many people think that expanding mushrooms takes some unique type of skill, or a minimum of extremely specialized growing conditions. But this is absolutely not true. In reality, mushrooms are as simple to develop as something else, and may be a great deal simpler to develop than numerous sorts of meals. They frequently need much less care and need growing conditions that potentially permit even a person in a city to develop them.

Did you realize, for example, that mushrooms can be grown in your personal flat? How effective is peroxide treatment in mushroom growing? I am currently able to grow grain or sawdust spawn consistently without contamination, the only exceptions being gross errors on my part getting my finger in the container, or dropping a lid, etc.

With agar cultures, I get occasional mold colonies, usually only on older plates at the edges where the peroxide has largely disappeared. The peroxide added to mushroom cultures decomposes entirely to water and oxygen as the mushroom mycelium occupies the substrate.

As a result, there can be no trace of the added peroxide left in the mushroom crop, beyond what is naturally there due to metabolic processes. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide itself is found naturally in all aerobic living organisms and in a variety of natural environments. From time immemorial, honeybees have secreted enzymes which add peroxide to their nectar, protecting it from bacteria, yeasts, and mold, and imparting antibacterial properties to the resulting honey.

The mycelia of certain mushrooms produce their own peroxide to help break down the woody substrates the organisms encounter. And peroxide is even a part of the healing defenses of the human organism.

Indeed, around the world, thousands of proponents of a system of healing called oxygen therapy ingest peroxide solution on a daily basis to cure various ills and promote vitality, and some people have done so for many years.

Much of the peroxide found in nature is created spontaneously by ultraviolet light falling on water. There is some question as to the effect peroxide oxidation may have on the mushroom substrate itself. Chlorine, when it reacts with organic materials like paper pulp, produces small amounts of dioxin, a very dangerous, cancercausing chemical. Hydrogen peroxide does not produce dioxin, and as a result, environmentalists are campaigning to get paper companies to bleach their paper fiber with peroxide rather than chlorine.

Still, it is conceivable that peroxide could produce some other harmful substance when it reacts with the organic materials in mushroom substrates. I have not ruled out this possibility, but I consider it unlikely. For one thing, living organisms have evolved for millions of years with hydrogen peroxide both in and around them. This means that aerobic organisms most likely have developed metabolic machinery to deal safely with the oxidation products that result from the reaction of peroxide with biological materials.

In addition, hydrogen peroxide is chemically quite stable in sterilized mushroom substrates, and the concentration of peroxide we\’re using is so low that the amount of substrate oxidation going on has to be very low indeed. Finally, I have seen absolutely no evidence of any mutagenic or toxic effect of peroxide-treated mushroom substrate on the mycelium or fruiting bodies.

Agar cultures containing hydrogen peroxide give fine, healthy halos of mycelium, and the final fruiting cultures produce mushrooms as beautiful as any grown by traditional methods. Organic certification standards vary from one place to another.

So far, I have heard from one correspondent that peroxide is acceptable for organic growing in Ontario, Canada, and another correspondent tells me that peroxide is allowed as a \”disinfectant\” for organic certification in British Columbia, Canada. I have not yet heard opinions from certifying organizations in any other locations. Handling and measuring the peroxide itself requires only a measuring pipette 10 ml volume and a graduated cylinder probably ml volume.

Preparing and handling bulk pellet fuel substrate by the methods described in the peroxide manual requires a covered pot for boiling and cooling water, a second pot such as a teapot to boil water for pasteurizing containers, and a larger container such as a five gallon plastic bucket with a tight-fitting lid.

If you are just a beginner at mushroom growing, whether or not you use the peroxide method, you will probably want a pressure cooker for making agar plates although they can be made, less reliably, without it , jars with lids, an alcohol lamp, a small scale or balance for weighing, some petri dishes, some small boxes, some fresh trash bags, a hand mister, and a cool space.

Volume II of the peroxide manual presents two peroxide methods for preparing bulk mushroom substrate in any quantity at room temperature.

These methods are well suited to commercial cultivation. Both volumes of the manual present peroxide methods for maintaining tissue cultures, storing strains, and preparing mushroom spawn, all crucial aspects of commercial cultivation as well. What are the comparative costs of growing mushrooms with peroxide and pellet fuel? This is a significant expense if you can get sawdust for free.

However, if you are using pellet fuel with peroxide, you can use ordinary trash bags to hold your substrate, rather than the special heat resistant space bags usually used for pressure cooking sawdust. In addition, with boiling water pasteurization of pellet fuel, you avoid lengthy pressure sterilization or lengthier steaming , so your energy costs are very low. Your amortized cost of equipment is also very low, especially compared to the costs of air filtering equipment and pressure cookers, autoclaves, or steam chambers.

Perhaps some of this difference should be balanced against the experimental nature of the peroxide substrates, which may take time to optimize for yields comparable to traditional substrates.

But this in turn should be balanced against the reduced contamination rate that can be expected using peroxide, even when compared to commercial set-ups using expensive contamination control systems. Try it yourself. To make sure your peroxide solution still has some punch, pour a little into a small glass and add a bit of banana. The solution should fizz vigorously. First pressure cook the medium for the standard length of time, then let the hot agar cool down, until you can handle the container comfortably.

Sterilize a measuring pipette or steep it in boiling hot water for a minute, then cool, before using it to transfer peroxide. After adding peroxide to the agar, mix it in thoroughly with a swirling motion. Then pour your plates. Petri dishes should be sterile. When your plates have solidified, take the tops off a couple of them and let them sit in the open air for a while, perhaps an hour. Then close them up and incubate for a week or two.

See any colonies? Meanwhile, inoculate some of the other plates with your favorite mushroom mycelium. You can work in the open air, but you\’ll still need to flame your scalpel as you ordinarily would. Wrap the inoculated plates in a plastic \”food storage\” bag and incubate.

Check back in a week or so. How are they doing? For best results with regular use, you\’ll need to measure the actual concentration of peroxide in your solution, to make sure that you have enough, and that you\’re not. You\’ll also need to \”clean\” the mycelium of occult contaminants that build up after a few transfers, or else you\’ll eventually be transferring bacteria instead of mycelium.

I describe the proper procedures in detail in the peroxide manual. Can morels be cultivated? How can I grow them? I want to grow chantrelles, Boletus edulis, matsutake, or truffles. How can I do it?

I want to start a mushroom growing business. How feasible will it be? I live in a hot climate. What mushrooms can I grow? How long does it take to grow mushrooms? What books are there that tell how to grow mushrooms? Yes, mushroom growers have worked out ways to cultivate morels, but these mushrooms are still among the most difficult to grow, at least in any quantity. For outdoor growing, some companies are selling morel \”kits. Agar cultures of morel mycelium and morel spawn can both be prepared by the peroxide method following the same procedures used for other mushrooms.

Morel spores germinate very quickly, and the mycelium grows faster than virtually any other mushroom mycelium, covering an agar plate in 3 days or so. But the difficulty with morels is getting the mushrooms to form. All of these species require association with a live tree to produce mushrooms, which makes them poor candidates for cultivation.

Of these four, only chantrelles have been grown \”in captivity,\” and then only by heroic measures which the hobbyist will not likely duplicate. There is also little evidence that any of the first three of these species can be deliberately introduced into a chosen outdoor plot where they are not already growing, either by spore slurries or mycelial transfer. The one exception is truffles, where tree seedlings have been successfully inoculated with spores from European truffles, and the trees have been grown to maturity in the US, eventually producing truffles.

For information on acquiring truffle tree seedlings, visit www. There is also some indication that Oregon white and black truffles can be introduced into suitable groves of Douglas fir trees by spore slurry inoculation. But because of unsuitable weather conditions for truffle growth in Oregon recently, it may be a number of years before this possibility can be clearly confirmed or disproven. The business of mushroom growing is not a simple one. Although it is easy to grow a few mushrooms for home consumption, it is far more difficult to grow a large number of mushrooms for commercial sale.

The reasons include problems of maintaining reliable supplies of substrates and supplements, regulating climate and ventilation, excluding insects and rodents, keeping equipment functioning, dealing with waste, excluding contaminants, maintaining production schedules, keeping stock cultures healthy and viable, and managing space requirements, among others.

And even if you succeed in growing the kind of crop you need to make money, you may run into other obstacles like high insurance prices and unreliable markets.

So, to be successful at mushroom growing, you need to be determined and you need to be good at improvising and solving problems. For more on the business of mushroom growing, visit the web site of the Mushroom Growers\’ Newsletter. The Paddy Straw mushroom, Volvariella volvacea and its close relative Volvariella bombecina, grow best at temperatures between 75 and 95 degrees F degrees C.

The almond mushroom, Agaricus subrufescens, is a warm grower, although the mycelium should not get above 90 degrees F. The King Stropharia, Stropharia. Beyond that, there may be mushrooms native to your area that people are cultivating.

Ask around! Although these mushrooms can all do well at warmer temperatures, remember that they all still need significant humidity. The answer to this question depends on several things, including the stage of mushroom growing you want to start with, the method of inoculation, the temperature, the kind of substrate you are using, the mushroom species, and the specific mushroom strain.

Starting at the very beginning, mushroom spores can take from a few hours to several days to germinate. A culture of mushroom mycelium growing on a petri dish of nutrient agar can take 24 hours for morels to upwards of a month for Agaricus species and Stropharia Rugosa-annulata, for example to spread across the better part of the plate.

Using a chunk of agar culture to inoculate small jar of spawn, it can take weeks for the spawn to reach maturity weeks if you inoculate the spawn with other spawn. If you start with a quantity of spawn and fresh bulk substrate, it takes about two to three weeks for standard oyster mushrooms to reach fruiting stage, and a similar length of time for Lions Mane although I prefer to incubate them longer before letting them fruit , whereas the Elm Oyster takes six weeks, and shiitake can take longer.

This all can be accomplished more quickly using liquid inoculation techniques. If you start with a ready-made kit, already grown-through with mushroom mycelium, it can take from a week to a month for mushrooms to form, depending on the species. Thicker, fleshier mushrooms tend to form and mature more slowly than others. In general, of course, the more optimum the substrate, the temperature, and any other relevant growing conditions, the faster the mushroom mycelium and the forming mushrooms will grow.

This new edition of Stamets\’s definitive text has been expanded by over pages compared to the 2nd edition. Covers cultivation of 31 species, from oyster mushrooms several chapters to shiitake to portobellos. This is the best available book on cultivating wood decomposing mushrooms by traditional that is, non-peroxide methods. This book is somewhat dated, but still the best reference available on growing Agaricus and other compost-loving species by traditional methods.

If you are going to grow shiitake mushrooms, you should definitely have this book in your collection. Open navigation menu. Close suggestions Search Search. User Settings. Skip carousel. Carousel Previous. Carousel Next. What is Scribd? Explore Ebooks. Bestsellers Editors\’ Picks All Ebooks. Explore Audiobooks. Bestsellers Editors\’ Picks All audiobooks. Explore Magazines. Editors\’ Picks All magazines.

Explore Podcasts All podcasts. Difficulty Beginner Intermediate Advanced. Explore Documents. Growing Mushrooms The Easy Way. Uploaded by Ramamohan Vallala. Did you find this document useful? Is this content inappropriate? Report this Document. Flag for inappropriate content. Download now. Jump to Page. Search inside document. Now translated into Spanish – Romanian And announcing: An entirely new approach to mushroom growing Non-Sterile Mushroom Cultivation Mushroom growing – a great pastime, but In stepwise directions, the peroxide manual explains how to: Grow mushroom cultures in an ordinary room.

Pouring Agar Plates Here I\’m pouring melted nutrient agar containing peroxide into a set of reusable plastic petri dishes. Virtually any commonly cultivated mushroom species can be grown on peroxide-treated nutrient agar Cutting agar to transfer mycelium Here I am using a metal X-acto knife, already sterilized in the flame of the alcohol lamp nearby, for cutting a chunk of agar culture from a peroxide plate to transfer the mushroom tissue mycelium to a jar of \”minute spawn\” medium, all in the open air of my kitchen.

Inoculating mushroom spawn Here I\’m inoculating a jar \”Ten-minute spawn\” medium in the open air with a chunk of mycelium from an agar culture of Hericium erinaceus, using a flame-sterilized X-acto knife for the transfer. Jars of Ten Minute Spawn on a Bookshelf Here\’s the bookshelf where I grow my peroxide-treated \”Ten Minute Spawn,\” which will be used to inoculate the final bulk substrate for mushroom production.

Once all the peroxide has broken down, the balloon is carefully removed and the oxygen is measured by releasing it into an inverted graduated cylinder filled with water Inoculating Pellet Fuel Mushroom Substrate Here I am, headless, inoculating a 5 gallon bucket of peroxide-treated oak pellet fuel substrate with a jar of elm oyster \”Ten minute spawn.

Bagging Pellet Fuel Mushroom Substrate Here I\’m pouring inoculated, peroxide-treated pellet fuel substrate from a 5 gallon bucket into a fresh plastic \”tall kitchen bag\” supported by a cardboard box. Mushroom substrate, bagged and sealed This is what my wood-decomposing mushroom cultures look like after the trash bag is filled with inoculated, peroxide-treated substrate and sealed with a twist tie.

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